Additional Learning Project

For my Additional Learning Project I choose the topic of cursive in the classroom. I started off having several questions: Is cursive still taught? What are different ways of teaching cursive? What are the pros and cons of learning cursive? And of course Do I even remember all the letters in cursive??

I choose this topic for a couple different reasons actually. One being one of my professors writes on the board in cursive almost every class. I found it sort of difficult to read all of it, which of course made taking notes harder than it already is in a fast pace classroom. Then I felt horribly sorry for a foreign student in my class who couldn’t read it all. Another reason being my cousin is in 7th grade and he didn’t learn cursive at all, which I found surprising. I just assumed they were still teaching but then I started to think that maybe it wasn’t so surprising with all the technology used in classrooms today, handwriting isn’t used as much anymore.

Then I went to work, I spent hours and hours reading, researching, and scoping through TONS of websites and some blogs. Through that I found a lot of different opinions and facts. I also found out I really didn’t remember half of the letters (uppercase and lowercase) meaning I needed to spend a few hours relearning them all. I thought it might be easy for me to pick up especially since I spent a whole year learning it (back in 3rd grade) but it really wasn’t. It wasn’t too difficult but it wasn’t as easy as I thought it was but I still finished! In order to relearn I looked at fun worksheets online and tried to duplicate each letter over and over and over again until it was stuck in my head.  Now I feel confident that I could write anything in cursive and most likely read anything in cursive. Down below I have attached some pictures of my cursive handwriting in progress!

With the help of Dr. Ellington I decided I would share some of my research and my own cursive handwriting in a blog to share with all my fellow bloggers. I knew I couldn’t share all of my research (that would be a lot for one blog) so I tried to condense it all to the most important and interesting facts and opinions which I listed here down below:

  • Interesting and Fun facts:
    • People who only write in cursive have been proved to score higher on SAT and AP tests
    • Cursive allows our hands to be “multilingual”
    • Cursive is a great way to work kinesthetic skills which may help those with special needs such as dysgraphia or dyslexia
    • Cursive activates a different part of the brain than normal writing does
    • Common Core Law does not include cursive in the standards
      • 42 states, 4 territories, and the Department of Defense Education Activity  have adopted this law
      • These standards only include skills that are testable and measurable
    • Some schools just teach students to write their names in cursive nothing else
    • Some schools haven’t taught in 10 to 15 years
    • Typically taught in 2nd grade
    • 2 methods: slanted or straight up and down
  • Pros of teaching cursive:
    • It allows us to create something beautiful
    • Learning cursive helps the child develop a tactic for learning in general
    • Helps develop motor skills
    • Teaches them how to sign legal documents
    • Cursive connects students to the past, lets them communicate with older generations
    • Leads to increased comprehension and participation
    • Allows student to write quicker
    • Can apply it later in life
    • Use it to read older documents such as the Constitution
  • Cons of teaching cursive:
    • Isn’t included in the Common Core State Standards
    • Takes time away from learning “relevant” subjects
    • It can be time-consuming
    • If students don’t use it regularly, it could be forgotten
    • Can be illegible at times
      • $95 million in tax refunds isn’t delivered because of unreadable forms
    • Technology is taking over already
    • Most teachers prefer typed essays and assignments
  • Ways of teaching cursive:
    • Worksheets (cut and connect dots)
    • In class on board
      • Work on a few letters each day
    • Practice over and over again

I could write so much more but these are the most important facts and they pretty much sum up my research! Personally I think cursive is a dying art. I do think it should still be taught today, even if they won’t use it in any other grades if they choose to do so. I believe all students should have some background of cursive to at least understand it. I’m actually very thankful that I was taught cursive (even though I had to reteach myself) it was a great experience in school that I wish all students would get a chance to have. Now I won’t have any troubles at all reading notes on the board and of course the letters grandma sends me!

Here are a few examples of my cursive handwriting progress:

I would love to hear your thoughts on teaching cursive in the classroom!!

A few of the sources I used are:

www.teachingcursive.com

http://thefederalist.com/2015/02/25/ten-reasons-people-still-need-cursive/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/memory-medic/201308/biological-and-psychology-benefits-learning-cursive

http://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/curriculum-instruction/5-reasons-cursive-writing-should-be-taught-in-school/

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2013/04/30/should-schools-require-children-to-learn-cursive/the-benefits-of-cursive-go-beyond-writing

https://www.aop.com/blog/the-pros-and-cons-of-cursive

http://www.corestandards.org/

http://blog.educents.com/should-we-still-teach-cursive-handwriting/

http://theconcordian.com/2013/02/cursive-writing-a-romantic-art-or-a-useless-hassle/

http://study.com/academy/lesson/how-to-teach-cursive-writing.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Additional Learning Project

  1. Great project! I am “pro” cursive. All in all, children learn cursive rather quickly if they practice it every day. I think cursive is very unique to each individual — it’s their trademark! Good luck next semester.

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